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markarayner

Dilettante

A cursory and curious listing of books and literatrivia. 

Academic Dumas-ery

Professor Montgomery Cristo: An Adjunct's Tale - Kane Faucher

Kane X. Faucher's latest novel is a brilliant adaptation the classic Alexander Dumas tale of revenge, The Count of Monte Cristo.

 

I've always loved the original, and Faucher's book is a wonderful satire that cleaves to the original plot so carefully, I was continually impressed. I kept thinking, "There's no way he can maintain this!" But he did. So, I would encourage you to read the original story at some point if you already haven't, so this pleasure is not denied to you.

 

In Professor Montgomery Cristo: An Adjunct's Tale, Dantes is an up-and-coming academic. A PhD candidate with a glorious academic future ahead of him. But then he is wrongly accused of plagiarism (the academic equivalent of murder) and his hopes are dashed. Instead of prison, Dantes's is sent to a second-rate university, where he must toil as an adjunct professor, where he meets another sessional who will help him achieve his revenge on the jealous academics who ruined him.

 

All the bones of the original story are there, and then fleshed out with this wonderful satire of the unjust treatment of sessional teachers at modern universities. Sometimes called contract faculty, the life of a sessional can be tough. Particularly when you are on what is called a limited duties appointment, which is renewable term by term. This means sessional don't always know what they are teaching or even IF they are teaching next semester. The pay is low, and there are often no benefits. At many universities upwards of 40% of courses are taught by adjuncts.

 

All of these injustices – and many more -- are satirized by Faucher in this novel, and it is really worth your time. Now in interests of full disclosure, I must tell you that I have been, and am, a contract faculty member, and that Kane is a colleague, but this is a wholehearted recommendation. This book has the pacing of Dumas and the wicked sense of humor and genius of Faucher.